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Today I Saw God

The Ring

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On the second day after my mother-in-law arrived from Bulgaria, she gave me a ring. When I asked my husband to translate from Bulgarian to Spanish, he confirmed what I suspected: the ring belonged to my mother-in-law's grandmother and was passed down in the family from generation to generation. She gave it to me because I'm the wife of her only son, and she wanted me to always have it.

For me, it meant a lot. I had only met her a few hours earlier. It was a very tender gesture on her part to give me the ring right away.

A few weeks later, I traveled to Pennsylvania for my nephew's graduation. After we arrived, we went to the mall with my sister and my nephew's friend. We entered a shop and saw a very interesting ring shaped like a cross. I decided to try it on. I removed the ring my mother-in-law had given me and put it halfway on another finger for safekeeping. After trying on the cross ring, we went back to the hotel.

That night, I went to bed early, and we were very busy the next day. We attended the graduation, followed by a reception. That night, I realized I didn't have my mother-in-law's ring on my hand. I was frantic! My sisters helped me look for the ring in my purse, in my suitcase, everywhere. But we couldn't find it. Then one of my sisters reminded me that I was trying on rings at the store the day before. Immediately, I called the store, but it was late and nobody answered.

The next day before returning to Virginia, we decided to go to the store. I had been praying to the Lord about my lost ring. It was not the financial value but the sentimental value that was important to me.

I prayed, "Mighty God, owner of everything in the world, I know that for you what I ask is not difficult. Perhaps in the eyes of men, it would be like trying to find a needle in a haystack, but for you, it is possible, because your word says that even our hairs are numbered, and I believe so. Father, you also say that we should be thankful when we request something. At this moment, I thank you in advance because you will find that ring, and I can wear it again. Thank you, Father, because in you I put my trust andyou are my Lord who can do anything. Amen."

My sister saw how hard I was praying in the car, asking with all the strength of my heart and with conviction that I would receive a response from God.

When we arrived at the store, my sister went to the first employee she saw and asked if they had found a ring two days earlier. We were sure the ring was lost there.I asked a young man who worked there. He checked the drawer and said that no, they had not found anything but that he would call his manager.

When the manager arrived, he asked me several questions about the ring. I described it: gold and like an antique. He said that he was sorry but they hadn't found anything.

While I was talking to the manager, my sister and nephew's friend approached the ring section. They lifted one ring and asked me if it could be my ring. When I looked, it was my ring! It had a price tag of $3.50. I ran to grab it. I hugged and kissed my sister and friend and said, "I serve the Lord who is God who makes the impossible possible."

The manager cut off the price tag and gave me the ring. As happy as I was when I found the ring, it was a joyful time for God also.

Thanking God who hears prayers of faith and conviction is what I always do. God answers you.

And I was glad to get this beautiful antique ring back. Our Heavenly Father has joy when you come back to him, because for him, we are precious and valuable jewels.

The post The Ring appeared first on Today I Saw God.

At the Worksite

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Editor's Note: This week 16 middle school students and fiveleaders traveled to Romney, West Virginia to participate in the Jeremiah Project. The following are updates from two of the students on the trip.

I went to the Jeremiah Project this year. I want to share what it was like on the worksite. You have to wear jeans at the site, and it is very hot. You have to drink lots of water to stay hydrated.

On the first day you get put on a work team. Your team creates a name for the week. After breakfast, you put in your lunch order and a team member packs a cooler. Then you head out to your site.

Some of the jobs include painting, carpentry or cleaning. One of the hardest jobs is silver sealing. Everything gets sticky and it's very annoying. It was a lot of fun. I loved JP.

Submitted by Wyatt Byrd.

Was there something memorable that a resident said to you on the trip?

Never give up no matter how much work it takes.

What did God show you or say to you on this trip?

God truly does work in mysterious ways.

What was fun or exciting about your service?

Getting to work with people, getting to know them and making new friends.

Submitted by Lindsay Byrd.

The post At the Worksite appeared first on Today I Saw God.

Toronto Student Mission Trip

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Editor's Note: This week 25 high school students and fiveleaders traveled to Toronto,Canada to do inner-city mission work. The following are updates from two of the students on the trip.

We were off to the church. Our luggage was squished into the back of our Toyota Highlander. It would be unloaded and then reloaded into the bus that would take us to Toronto. We checked in, said farewells to parents, completed the usual pre-mission trip duties and then we prayed.

While we were standing in a big circle, hands linked with total strangers who I would travel with, I felt God's presence there, ready to help us through the upcoming week of volunteering. The prayer ended, but God's presence lingered, staying with us as we occupied the bus and drove away.

Stops were made, long McDonald's lines were endured, questionable gas stop purchases were made and an absurd amount of soda was drank, but we made it to Canada. It's a really pretty place.

I'm looking forward to the rest of our time in this beautiful country. And I know everyone here will strive to help others and become better and stronger children of God in the process.

Submitted by Jessie Taylor.

Even though my group worked to improve the living space for many homeless women today, I saw God elsewhere.

After our cleaning and organizing, we sang karaoke with the women. I saw God as the women's faces lit up with joy and excitement about our singing. I saw God in everyone who sang and how enthusiastic they all were.

God brought joy to the women in the shelter and our group today in an unexpected way.

Submitted by Craig Benson.

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The Rain Will Come

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It was just a couple of months ago that I remember walking across my lawn thinking how wet the grass had become. With each step taken, I could hear the water squishing under my feet after a very wet spring. The grass, trees and plants were all green and vibrant with color. It seemed that I could almost see the grass growing each week, as I was mowing the lawn more frequently than seemed justifiable. I would come home in the evening, try to get the yard mowed before another band of rain would pass over the area, then repeat this process again later in the week. While I did not enjoy the extra mowing, at least everything was nice and green.

Then the rain stopped. What was once a lush, green lawn slowly turned into a brown yard that looked neglected and thirsty. The squishing that I had heard before was now replaced with a brittle, dry sound that is not pleasant to hear. If grass could talk I am sure this lawn was begging for water to drink. I felt guilty that my yard, trees and plants no longer looked alive and healthy, but neglected and sad. Several times a week I would pull out the water hose and attempt to revive a tired looking lawn. Regardless of my attempts, nothing seemed to work. Then the rain returned, and along with it everything seemed to green up much better and faster than what I alone could accomplish.

This can even apply to our daily lives. There have been times in my life when I have felt like the dry lawn that I described, then when I least expected it, the "rain" would come and through Jesus things were made new again. He hears our prayers, and the comfort this provides allows me to make it through rough times, knowing that my trust is in God to provide in ways I may never imagine, or ever accomplish on my own. As found in Matthew 19:26, "Jesus looked at them and said, 'With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.'" Next time you feel tired and thirst for help, know your prayers are being heard and that God reigns over all of us.

The post The Rain Will Come appeared first on Today I Saw God.

Into the Desert

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The sea has parted forming a wall of water on both sides and a commanding voice booms, "You may paaasss."That's how I have always pictured the scene as the ancient Israelites marched, en mass, through the red sea on their way out of Egypt. I imagine Moses at the helm, smiling triumphantly, exuberantly and perhaps a little relievedly as his magic staff actually accomplished what God had told him it would: Let my people go!

Yet, according to the book of Exodus, the Israelites were none too sure about things, Red Sea parting or not:

As Pharaoh approached, the Israelites looked up, and there were the Egyptians, marching after them. They were terrified and criedout to theLord.They said to Moses, "Was it because there were no graves in Egypt that you brought us to the desert to die?What have you done to us by bringing us out of Egypt?Didn't we say to you in Egypt, 'Leave us alone; let us serve the Egyptians'? It would have been better for us to serve the Egyptians than to die in the desert!" – Exodus 11:10-12

"Was it because there were no graves in Egypt that you brought us to the desert to die?"Ironically, this was the phrase that overtook me as I encountered theactualdesert for the first time.The Sahara of North Africa was stark, dry and barren; sand upon sand as far as the eye could see.

I had been looking forward to this family excursion for months. The trip was planned, a guide secured, preparations made, clothing purchased and accommodations booked. All was made ready for our travel to Morocco. This day's journey was the trip's crown jewel: riding camels through the desert to a campsite where we would spend the night in tents under the expanse of a night sky, completely unspoiled by ambient light of any humankind. We would be alone with the stars in the desert. What bliss

But first, the desert. Just mounting my camelwas a bit harrowing as she lurched forward and then backward to achieve her standing, but as the guide led our small family group toward the dunes, I settled into the clippety-clop rhythm of my ride.I even loosened my death grip on the saddle slightly as we started up the first dune.

The setting was like nothing I'd ever seen. It was the purest expression of two complimentary colors: an infinity in grains of carmelized sand piled against an inestimable expanse of sky blue. The line separating them as if a kindergartner had drawn it with a crayon. The scene was miraculous, both breathtakingly beautiful and ominously frightening. Fear and awe all at once.

No greenery. No trees. No water. Only sprigs of dried grasses. Hardly a sign of life of any kind. And we were setting out into it. All I could think was:"Was it because there were no graves in Egypt that you brought us to the desert to die?" Those Israelites had a point. Just imagine being led away from everything you ever knew, all supply, all solace and all resources into a promised land that looked anything but promising. My judgment of those Israelites was premature. I forgive them their doubt.

And yet, the awe and beauty was palpable in its simplicity, quiet and tranquility as we upped and downed the dunes. Silent movement. Slow trudging progress towardHow did our guide know which way to go with no landmarks and no visual cues? Everything looked exactly the same to me. The occasional brave pebble rolled downward, displaced by our camels' hooves, but a brief gust of sultry wind would wipe away the footsteps and remove all evidence that we were here.

We had placed our wellbeing in the hands of our guide, a mere teenager. He was a member of a nomadic tribe whose family had lived and loved this land for generations. He didn't speak our language, and we didn't speak his. Still, we let ourselves be guided and came to trust our sturdy ridesup and over, out and around, over and back, side hill and downhillas one does the mule who carries you along the switchbacks overlooking the Grand Canyon."They don't often lose people on these trips," I told myself.

When the campsite came within view, I confess I exhaled a relieved sigh. Light was growing dimmer and all of me could use a rest. It had cooled off from the daytime 105 degrees to an evening "low" in the upper 90s. As evening fell and stars appeared overhead, we trudged up the nearby dune to get a closer look. Laying back and resting on the fine, dry Sahara sand, we looked up at the stars the same ones that overlooked all the earth's inhabitants and the very same that accompanied the ancient Israelites; still they twinkled down at us. I was completely entranced.

The miraculous always astounds me. With reverence, we set off to see and understand and experience on holy ground. Then we come before God in complete awe and he reminds us of his promise to Abraham and his son Isaac, and through them, to us.

"I will surely bless youand make your descendantsas numerous as the stars in the skyand as the sand on the seashore." – Genesis 22:17

Now, it seems odd that the Lord spoke of the sand on the seashore to a people in the desert. Perhaps, he had in mind to part the sea.

This post originally appeared on "The Kinesthetic Christian."

The post Into the Desert appeared first on Today I Saw God.

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